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The Challah Table

Materials:

American Black Walnut, Brass & Steel

Dimensions:

20″ x 14″ x 2″ 

About:

To observe the sacred Shabbos one is required to act passively on the seventh day of each week however sanctifying this holy day is done when we consecrate our Shabbos meals over the most elevated agricultural products, bread & wine.

Our sages (Shabbos 31a) teach that faith in God is typified by agriculture. 

On the seventh day of each week when we refrain from work, we submit ourselves to G-d which draws renewal from above for the upcoming six work days. 

Bread has a unique status as the King among all food.

It is typically represented as the first of the seven agricultural species of Israel (wheat). It denotes wealth and prosperity and is needed to consecrate the obligatory Sabbath meals in accordance with Jewish law. Although we ordinarily use wine for the verbal sanctification of the Shabbos at the beginning of the meal (Kiddush), if wine is not present our sages (Shulchan Aruch 271:12; Rema 272:9) say that Kiddush should instead be made on bread. 

To observe and sanctify the loftiness of Shabbos, we stop from creating/working and enlist the most elevated products of the earth (Israel) because both the heavens and the earth (Shmita) celebrate a Sabbatical and are holy. 

Sitting at a higher plane, the Challah Table hints at the distinction that was afforded this hallowed food in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. One that has always required us to give thanks and say grace. 

Note: The Challah Table has a removable top with one side dedicated for cutting and the other for display. This removable top is about .25 inches thick and because of its length and width would normally warp similarly to a potato chip. To control this wood movement, the board was opened up like a sandwich and a gridded steel structure was inserted before it was resealed. 

The spheres on each leg are hand turned on the lathe and the rest hand carved. Each leg is attached to the table with a mortise and tenon joint.

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